DIVORCE

If you and your spouse have decided to get separated or divorced, but want to avoid the financial and emotional upheaval of a bitter, contested divorce, you are not alone. Although the very contentious divorces are the ones that make headlines, many people seek a different path to dissolution of their marriage.

People hope that a marriage will last forever. There may be disappointment and resentment when a marriage ends, but that does not mean the divorce must turn into an adversarial legal battle. It is possible to have an amicable divorce that ends the marriage with integrity. What it takes is two people who are willing and able to face what has happened in the marriage, to focus on the future instead of the past, and who want to find a solution that is best for both of them. That does not mean that there is no conflict. Rather, both parties are able and willing to work through the conflict to develop solutions that are in both parties’ best interests. Every conflict is unique and every relationship faces its own set of challenges. A mediator or collaborative attorney will identify the issues that need to be addressed, uncover what is important to each party, and craft a solution that satisfies their needs.

Can a┬áDivorce be “Simple”?

Of course, divorce is a major life event with emotional significance for any couple. But for some couples, there is a limited number of decisions that need to be made in order to get a legal divorce. We have worked with a number of clients who do not have children, have limited marital assets and a strong desire to divorce with the minimum amount of time, money and legal strain. Couples in this situation appreciate how mediation or collaborative law can make the legal divorce process smooth and simple.

The Legal Process

The chart below illustrates the legal steps necessary to get a divorce in California. As a mediator or collaborative attorney, we will walk you through each step, help you prepare the paperwork and ensure that all documents are submitted on time.

*The earliest the Court will grant a divorce is six months from the day the Respondent is served.

**Divorce refers to dissolution of marriage or a domestic partnership.

We offer a free 30-minute consultation to help you determine whether mediation or collaborative law would be appropriate for your situation.